Changes In How Artists Earn:From Patrons to Patreon
#1
I don't now if this topic is fitting for this subform but its now more than ever become a topic of much debate in the world of global media with the rise of AI Art, that being how do artists earn money and get their work out?

On this quite vast topic I wish to focus on one recent model which has become more and more popular with each year of the 21st century that the direct to audience method I call it(dunno if there's a proper term for it). With the internet no longer would the artist have to deal with middlemen! Just get your own portal up set up a payment processor and now you could create without having to leave your vision unfiltered because a middle man be it the producers in film or the publisher in literature said so.

Of course the reality is not exactly this ideal there are many questions now asked and maybe conversation could answer them. What has really changed in the world of getting media out there? Has this method brought any modern greats to light or is just really another zogslop pipeline as it stands? Is it fundamentally going "against the spirit" of the internet to charge a cost for artistic works? Are all these questions false and red herrings for the real  ones? Discuss...
#2
I think a lot about artists and money. Money is the great problem for all quality humanity. And that includes our great artists. There's this fascinating spectrum that runs from starving autists to eccentric geniuses who were able to channel it into being worshipped by normalfaggots. Some cases worthy of consideration:

- Elvis: Became a living God, had a weird exploitative manager, could basically do whatever he wanted.
- Michael Jackson: Became a living god, built his own outer heaven. Read PT Barnum to work on showmanship and appeal. Wanted to create the Marvel Cinematic Universe over a decade before The Avengers came out.
- Vincent Gallo: Possibly some kind of former criminal, among god knows what else. Has made at least two pieces of completely personal, indulgent, and uncompromising art, pissed off the whole planet, and now somehow has enough fuck you money to comfortably do whatever he wants forever.
- George Lucas: Created a living religious tradition, merchandise empire, greatest pop cultural success of all time. Went from needing his buddy Coppola to convince the suits THX1138 was worth it, to making a mountain of money with the basically pleasing American Graffiti, to his completely unbelievable personal dream project which has defined culture ever since.
#3
The ideal exists somewhere in the middle between the spectrum of stuffy suits grinding out formulaic content driven by algorithms, and individuals completely lost in their hurp gup creativity universe unconscious of any concept of quality control or feedback. Ironically, when things are dysfunctional, like now, you get both at the same time. I think it's very possible to not only fail to serve audiences to the highest capacity one can, but it is also very possible for the audience or environment to fail to serve artists. The people of now who are artistically inclined (truly, not in the fake way, those who have vision and want to execute that) are not well served by their complete and total freedom, it results in stunted and repetitive cancerous growth. Corporate layer art and music is genuinely so beyond the pale in my opinion anybody who discusses it as a serious is only worthy of being completely written off as a poptimist, total disregard of opinion. 

The big change here is lack of interference. I have made the analogy throughout the years to metagaming in competitive online settings. The development of the "culture of playing the game" gets ground down over time into slotted strategies that the players beeline towards, then the devs notice this and respond to it by creating new content as slots for players to fill. This is ultimately a kind of nihilism, there is no exhileration in playing of the game at that point and both developers and players become content to fall into the path of least resistance. On the independent layer people want to go into their respective slots and that should be that. Generally I think there's a much greater prevelance of "lone wolves" in the current artistic crop and those who do find vertices of artistic tension (ie a fellow genius or challenging audience to 'mutually interfere' with on the artistic level) often do so out of sheer dumb luck. 

Money is not THE problem, although as a matter of survival in a world where economic forces push you towards deracinated misery slavery, it is a huge obstacle. It can't be summoned through deliberate action, though. Money comes as a consequence of a functional audience-artist interface. Even those who "make it" now are probably still acting in the capacity of a business owner, and having to break even in order to create self-funding for their various projects (vastly difference from.appealing to large corporate distributors to get funding...which was a better system, since this layer of 'self-employment' didn't interfere with their existence as an artist foremost)
#4
Grifting inevitably compromises the self and the spirit. If you believe in the merit of your words and thought, write them freely - otherwise, it is likely that one will eventually start writing things simply to make a profit. Very few people are capable of high-quality output on a weekly basis, and most need long periods of digestion and contemplation to manifest worthwhile work. By chaining yourself to substack or Patreon, you will eventually begin to cater to the whims and needs of the crowd to sustain yourself. Sometimes you might even end up subject to external forms of pressure. The culture of substack is absolute poison to everything it touches.

Intelligent aspiring artists should learn to program and get a lazy-ass SV job that requires sub-5 hours of work per week, and dedicate the remainder of their time to the craft.
#5
(01-03-2023, 12:50 PM)Zed Wrote: Grifting inevitably compromises the self and the spirit. If you believe in the merit of your words and thought, write them freely - otherwise, it is likely that one will eventually start writing things simply to make a profit. Very few people are capable of high-quality output on a weekly basis, and most need long periods of digestion and contemplation to manifest worthwhile work. By chaining yourself to substack or Patreon, you will eventually begin to cater to the whims and needs of the crowd to sustain yourself. Sometimes you might even end up subject to external forms of pressure. The culture of substack is absolute poison to everything it touches.

Intelligent aspiring artists should learn to program and get a lazy-ass SV job that requires sub-5 hours of work per week, and dedicate the remainder of their time to the craft.

What are these jobs? I don't even know what SV means.
#6
SuperVeloce (Lamborghini)
#7
Japan is a country with a good 'art culture,' but this goes without saying.
Further thoughts: What System mentioned applies there. People are as quick to blame editors and publishers and what-not for not binding and shoving their artist correctly, as they are to blame the artist himself for floundering.
The Red Hood manga from a little while ago is a hilarious example of this. An artist painfully faceplanting because his editors failed to weigh him down and carve at his flesh.

Now, I'm curious. What are everyone's thoughts on Patronage?

I'd definitely buy out animation studios and artists if I could, and force them to make things to my tastes.
I don't see anything in the modern world that contradicts doing that. If anything it makes more sense in the present than it did five hundred years ago, as there are proportionally both more rich men and artists. If as the libtards say, the richest have enough money to last ten thousand lifetimes, why not go all out into everything you've ever wanted? Maybe because they're all too old to dream, but...

I assume the primary reason it doesn't happen is because not funneling all your wealth into Black Lives Mattering and Sustainable Green Technology By Black Women is verboten to our rich. They put their ego in check, and focus on 'bettering the Earth' in the most useless ways possible. They're too ashamed to spend it on anything else.
Where are the megalithic golden estates and vanity projects? Trump is the only rich man I know who even considers such things.
#8
(01-05-2023, 09:30 AM)Starn Wrote: Japan is a country with a good 'art culture,' but this goes without saying.
Further thoughts: What System mentioned applies there. People are as quick to blame editors and publishers and what-not for not binding and shoving their artist correctly, as they are to blame the artist himself for floundering.
The Red Hood manga from a little while ago is a hilarious example of this. An artist painfully faceplanting because his editors failed to weigh him down and carve at his flesh.

Now, I'm curious. What are everyone's thoughts on Patronage?

I'd definitely buy out animation studios and artists if I could, and force them to make things to my tastes.
I don't see anything in the modern world that contradicts doing that. If anything it makes more sense in the present than it did five hundred years ago, as there are proportionally both more rich men and artists. If as the libtards say, the richest have enough money to last ten thousand lifetimes, why not go all out into everything you've ever wanted? Maybe because they're all too old to dream, but...

I assume the primary reason it doesn't happen is because not funneling all your wealth into Black Lives Mattering and Sustainable Green Technology By Black Women is verboten to our rich. They put their ego in check, and focus on 'bettering the Earth' in the most useless ways possible. They're too ashamed to spend it on anything else.
Where are the megalithic golden estates and vanity projects? Trump is the only rich man I know who even considers such things.

Patronage is cool when you have quality rich people. A problem of our time with massive knock-on effects not too many people think about is how disgusting our rich are. This is meant to be an age that rewards work and merit, but as you say, our rich people are human garbage who just dump money into black holes that all amount to empowering and sustaining leftists. The old aristocratic disdain for new-money was well founded. The money-earners are ruined by their wagecuck lifestyle and their children are ruined by a culture which teaches them to be ashamed of themselves and aspire downwards.

Peter Greenaway has alluded to a rich sponsor before. I wonder who that is...

And how Japan sustains popular art and culture really deserves its own thread. Exceptionally interesting subject that could tie into a lot of other things. Primary theme being that they're proof that nationalist economic policies are simply the best. Produce for domestic strength.
#9
(01-05-2023, 09:30 AM)Starn Wrote: Now, I'm curious. What are everyone's thoughts on Patronage? ... If anything it makes more sense in the present than it did five hundred years ago, as there are proportionally both more rich men and artists. If as the libtards say, the richest have enough money to last ten thousand lifetimes, why not go all out into everything you've ever wanted? Maybe because they're all too old to dream, but...
the reality is that "rich people" are far less rich than they ever have been, because everything worth buying takes far more money these days than it ever has. an average middle class man in the 19th century could easily afford a large family and servants, but now that sort of thing is a luxury exclusive to the "properly" rich. quantitatively, patronage amounts to financing one individual's entire lifestyle, and in those units the average buying power has decreased drastically.
#10
Patronage hasn't ever ended, it's always been around, and furthermore it is how the majority of marketable art is produced. As has been said, modern patronage just sucks because the elite are primarily concerned with ROI and ZOG heads eat it up. The patrons of Marvel movies are the Disney profit centers, but it is still "patronage", a financial power directing those who have the artistic technical skills to realize a vision.

What's great about digital media, the internet, intellectual property law etc. is that it brings an element of "mass patronage" to the production of things like books, drawings, video games. It is much easier to publish yourself on Amazon, much easier to get a game onto Steam, than either were in the past. The digital age also has piracy which means any purchase is de facto voluntary for consumption. Any independent artist can do whatever they want and there are very easy ways to get their supporters to prop them up financially. The very lucky ones get merchandise deals.
#11
(01-12-2023, 01:13 PM)Corvid Wrote: Patronage hasn't ever ended, it's always been around, and furthermore it is how the majority of marketable art is produced. As has been said, modern patronage just sucks because the elite are primarily concerned with ROI and ZOG heads eat it up. The patrons of Marvel movies are the Disney profit centers, but it is still "patronage", a financial power directing those who have the artistic technical skills to realize a vision.

What's great about digital media, the internet, intellectual property law etc. is that it brings an element of "mass patronage" to the production of things like books, drawings, video games. It is much easier to publish yourself on Amazon, much easier to get a game onto Steam, than either were in the past. The digital age also has piracy which means any purchase is de facto voluntary for consumption. Any independent artist can do whatever they want and there are very easy ways to get their supporters to prop them up financially. The very lucky ones get merchandise deals.

elite are concerned with ROI? You mean Return on Investment right? If so, this thought fails the Japan test. Niggers are not inherently appealing. Anything can be forced as a meme with enough effort, but it'll never be as easy as selling what people actually want. Japan test.


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