Health noob
#1
I'm new to health and fitness. I'm average right now, nothing incredible but feel like I'm often tired and as if my vitality is being sucked away. I'm not sure if this is caused by my diet, which goes mostly unmoderated, or my boring ass job. I'm not sure what a young man should even be on the lookout for food-wise. It's such a broad field it's hard to figure out where to start, so if anyone has advice for people who've never been taught about nutrition I'd appreciate it. 

Staying away from soyglop like fast food is a given but it seems like high fructose bullshit is in everything now and idk anything about seed oils. Everyone's face is so ugly and dysgenic compared to what they used to look like (even just comparing the older people in my family to the young ones). So my question is how can you avoid that happening to you and especially your children? Where is a good place to start in learning about nutrition?
#2
I believe a very good metric for the intangible aspects of health are your testosterone levels. If you have high test you are healthy; if you have low test then you are unhealthy. Also cancer is unhealthy, but that’s hard to measure. Substances or experiences that are unhealthy are either estrogenic (lowers natural T output and makes your sons low T) or mutagenic (makes your children retarded cripples). You don’t have to worry about other intangible thingslike vitamins or inflammation, unless you have low T, and even then you are just optimizing your vitaminerals as a path to getting more T.

Other aspects to health are extremely simple and easy to measure, eg running speed, barbell strength, how many chin ups you can do, waist circumference, BMI, and you can easily set goals for yourself and measure those things.

It is a complicated subject, but it will be easier to learn once you see through the charlatans that health really is just two things + being athletic and looking good.
#3
A good basis can probably be found in foods that your family/blood-line ate for a long period of time. These are things you will probably tolerate well at the least. If you cook on your own as much as possible you can choose the oils, ingredients etc. You can't do much about microplastics in water/soil. But you can filter your water. And you can choose which meat and which vegetables to buy. Simply taking this initiative is the first step in nutrition: Taking control.

BillyONare is also correct and t-maxxing is always a good idea. If you don't get much sunlight take vitamin d3 and vitamin k2. Even if you do get sunlight it's probably worthwhile. OMAD (one meal a day) is good for cutting if you are able to consume a large amount of protein in that 1 meal. Two meals a day is also effective although less-so. In general, some time spent in caloric restriction is good for the body.

It's hard to recommend a general resource for education on the subject because I operate off cobbled-together things that I found here and there and through experience. There is also much conflict between various theories and groups regarding nutrition.
#4
If you have high testosterone then you probably aren't being exposed to much "microplastics" type substances, so it frees you to not be too paranoid about it. But still think about it and dont do dumb stuff like put warm food or drinks in plastic containers or have a PVC shower curtain. Getting in shape and having a high testosterone level will free you from the anxiety of worrying about the more invisible bad stuff.

Health should be GOAL and METRIC oriented towards things that are important and simple to measure rather than having a "purity mindset". This is the perspective that I am trying to get at.

You can also go by what makes you feel good. Idk if seed oils are that bad for you, but I get sluggish and nauseous after eating them. Aspirin, hot black coffee, and chocolate cheesecake make me feel good so I think Ray Peat is onto something. Eating a big meal with lots of fat, salt, and red meat makes me feel awesome, like a big plate of eggs, bacon, salami, and ham.

I like to eat 1-2 times per day because it saves me time and money and keeps me from getting fat. the more often you eat the hungrier you get throughout the day which is annoying to me and I am annoyed by other people saying they are hungry all the time.
#5
BillyONare Wrote:I believe a very good metric for the intangible aspects of health are your testosterone levels. If you have high test you are healthy; if you have low test then you are unhealthy. Also cancer is unhealthy, but that’s hard to measure. Substances or experiences that are unhealthy are either estrogenic (lowers natural T output and makes your sons low T) or mutagenic (makes your children retarded cripples). You don’t have to worry about other intangible thingslike vitamins or inflammation, unless you have low T, and even then you are just optimizing your vitaminerals as a path to getting more T.

Other aspects to health are extremely simple and easy to measure, eg running speed, barbell strength, how many chin ups you can do, waist circumference, BMI, and you can easily set goals for yourself and measure those things.

It is a complicated subject, but it will be easier to learn once you see through the charlatans that health really is just two things + being athletic and looking good.

Thanks for your response, if you don't mind I have a couple of questions: 

This makes sense, although how would one measure their T in the first place?
What are some substances or experiences that could lower your T?
What are some vitamins that increase T?

And you are right about the charlatans, so many liars when it comes to health.
#6
Guest Wrote:A good basis can probably be found in foods that your family/blood-line ate for a long period of time. These are things you will probably tolerate well at the least. If you cook on your own as much as possible you can choose the oils, ingredients etc. You can't do much about microplastics in water/soil. But you can filter your water. And you can choose which meat and which vegetables to buy. Simply taking this initiative is the first step in nutrition: Taking control.

BillyONare is also correct and t-maxxing is always a good idea. If you don't get much sunlight take vitamin d3 and vitamin k2. Even if you do get sunlight it's probably worthwhile. OMAD (one meal a day) is good for cutting if you are able to consume a large amount of protein in that 1 meal. Two meals a day is also effective although less-so. In general, some time spent in caloric restriction is good for the body.

It's hard to recommend a general resource for education on the subject because I operate off cobbled-together things that I found here and there and through experience. There is also much conflict between various theories and groups regarding nutrition.

Thank you for the good advice. I've read moderately about the benefits of fasting before, I've also fasted for religious reasons and I must say the benefits are extraordinary. Heightened awareness, speak clearer, process problems faster, its feels like it activates something in the back brain giving you a primal surge that's sponsored by your body trying to survive. Although, I've never fasted solely for my health so I'll be trying the OMAD. Do you have any suggestions for a good high protein meal to have once a day?
#7
vivacristorey Wrote:[...]
Probably most important fix: cook your own food. It's almost impossible to eat unhealthy if you cook it yourself. Prefer non-processed foods, meaning the closer it looks to how it's dug out of ground/ripped out of an animal, the better. You'll also save tons of money. Of course cooking takes time, especially if you're not used to it. Here, routine is your friend. Normally I'd say "eat anything you like," but since some people have been really fucked up by their parents, this may not bode well. But rule of thumb: if it's unprocessed, it's probably good, so if you like it, eat it however much you want. Instincts are your friend.

When it comes to working out, best if it's something even remotely enjoyable. I think weightlifting is the most bang for the buck when it comes to time-result ratio. Cardio requires more time, but is also good and to some extent necessary. Noobs usually have a tendency to push themselves too hard and then burn out and give up. Don't do that, don't be a retard. Start slow. The absolutely most important priority is to build it into a sustainable habit. Here too, routine is your friend. For weightlifting I recommend the Starting Strength or 5x5 Stronglifts plan. They're meant for noobs and start with low weights and gradually build on them.

Nerd stuff (not very important): I recommend to start reading food packages. Especially so if you need to drop/increase weight (quitting skelly mode). Check the calories, because some foods (non-processed) have retarded high energy amounts (>200kcal/100g). Sugar is also stupid, and they stuff it in everything: anything above 5g sugar per 100g food is retarded, unless it's a dessert. Personally I keep it at 2g/100g or less. Check the salt levels: you'll prolly want it at some 2-4g per day total. Processed foods have insane levels. Don't mind fats: nobody really knows shit whether cholesterol is bad or good (and science seems to begin to pointing that it's actually good). If you want fat, eat fat (I love fat). Don't make a fuss about it, no excel shit or calculators. Just try and get an intuition going about these things. It becomes automatic and you'll soon know the stuff by heart with most foods anyway. Count calories only at first, to get the ballpark down, and in combination with regular weighing to know if you need to eat more or less.

Honestly I cannot stress this enough: don't go overboard. Focus on building a sustainable routine. If it doesn't feel like something you can do for the rest of your life, you won't do it. Your ability, endurance and motivation all will rise naturally, and eventually you'll be doing more than you'd ever have expected anyway.

BillyONare Wrote:I like to eat 1-2 times per day because it saves me time and money and keeps me from getting fat. the more often you eat the hungrier you get throughout the day which is annoying to me and I am annoyed by other people saying they are hungry all the time.
This is a good cheat. Besides time, money, and weight, it's also good for blood sugar and other nerd stuff, probably good for cells on some hippy level that makes you live longer, and definitely good for teeth, because they're not inundated with food for bacteria all day long. Bonus points for the ability to look down on others. They will literally think you're a god because you don't have to stuff your face all the time.
#8
vivacristorey Wrote:
Guest Wrote:A good basis can probably be found in foods that your family/blood-line ate for a long period of time. These are things you will probably tolerate well at the least. If you cook on your own as much as possible you can choose the oils, ingredients etc. You can't do much about microplastics in water/soil. But you can filter your water. And you can choose which meat and which vegetables to buy. Simply taking this initiative is the first step in nutrition: Taking control.

BillyONare is also correct and t-maxxing is always a good idea. If you don't get much sunlight take vitamin d3 and vitamin k2. Even if you do get sunlight it's probably worthwhile. OMAD (one meal a day) is good for cutting if you are able to consume a large amount of protein in that 1 meal. Two meals a day is also effective although less-so. In general, some time spent in caloric restriction is good for the body.

It's hard to recommend a general resource for education on the subject because I operate off cobbled-together things that I found here and there and through experience. There is also much conflict between various theories and groups regarding nutrition.

Thank you for the good advice. I've read moderately about the benefits of fasting before, I've also fasted for religious reasons and I must say the benefits are extraordinary. Heightened awareness, speak clearer, process problems faster, its feels like it activates something in the back brain giving you a primal surge that's sponsored by your body trying to survive. Although, I've never fasted solely for my health so I'll be trying the OMAD. Do you have any suggestions for a good high protein meal to have once a day?

Steak, eggs, vegetables, potatoes is an easy one to prepare. But you can replace steak with lower priced cuts of meat as well if necessary (stew meats, ground beef etc.) And then you just prepare whatever meat you have access to in a way you enjoy. Example, you can toss round roast beef in an instant pot/other type of cooker with carrots, potatoes, stock and/or seasoning. This will give you a solid amount of food for two days probably. I supplement my OMAD with 2 scoops (about 55 grams) of whey protein a day as well however. This makes it a bit easier, although some don't enjoy drinking protein shakes. Beef/good fish are my preferred choices for meat. I will rarely do chicken (not enough fat/less hormonal benefits.) And I will do pork from time-to-time (cured meats generally, pizza, pasta, etc.) I've done OMAD with home-made pizzas and it works pretty well too. Cured meats and pork are not as good for me however, I simply enjoy the taste.
I agree with those fasting benefits, I experience similar things generally. With OMAD be sure to set a solid hour aside for your one meal...because you might be sleepy after eating and it might take you longer to eat than expected.



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