Historical Amarnites
#1
This is a thread for posting about men of the past who would be Amarnite material today. We shall start with the eminent genius Erwin Schrödinger.

Schrödinger kept a record of his sexual liaisons including young maidens he sexually conquered in a diary he called Ephemeridae, in which he stated a "predilection for teenage girls on the grounds that their innocence was the ideal match for his natural genius".[43]

At the age of 39, Schrödinger tutored 14-year-old "Ithi" Junger. As John Gribbin recounted in his 2012 biography of Schrödinger, "As well as the maths, the lessons included 'a fair amount of petting and cuddling' and Schrödinger soon convinced himself that he was in love with Ithi".[44] Schrödinger assured Junger she would not become pregnant, and raped her at 17. She later became pregnant and had an abortion that left her sterile.[43][45] Schrödinger left her soon after and moved on to other targets.[46] Kate Nolan, a pseudonym used by surviving family to protect the victim, was also impregnated by Schrödinger amid claims of a lack of "consent."

Carlo Rovelli notes in his book Helgoland that Schrödinger "always kept a number of relationships going at once – and made no secret of his fascination with preadolescent girls". In Ireland, Rovelli writes, he had one child each from two students[47] identified in a Der Standard article as being a 26-year-old and a married political activist of unknown age.[45] While carrying out research into a family tree, Bernard Biggar uncovered reports of Schrödinger grooming his cousin, Barbara MacEntee, when she was 12 years old.[43] Apparently, her uncle, the mathematician and priest Pádraig de Brún, advised Schrödinger to no longer pursue her,[45] and Schrödinger later wrote in his journal that she was one of his "unrequited loves".[48] MacEntee died in 1995, with the accounts emerging posthumously.[49]

Walter Moore's biography of the scientist outlined that Schrödinger's attitude towards women was "essentially that of a male supremacist",[50] an assessment corroborated by Helge Kragh in his review of Moore's biography, "The conquest of women, especially very young women, was the salt of life for this sincere romantic and male chauvinist".[5


You will NEVER be this giga chad.
#2
disregarding 'historical'

frank amodeo

that japanese billionare who tried to order himself 1000 100% japanese sons and daughters via surrogacy in the Philippines. fucking retard should have used some patsies now womb rental is KYCd up the yangang
#3
Dirlewanger

Frank Lloyd Wright

Goethe
#4
From "Napoleon: A Life" by The Right Honourable Andrew Roberts, Baron of Belgravia:
Quote:Alongside that 15,000-word treatise, Napoleon wrote The Hare, the Hound and the Huntsman, a short comic fable in verse from echoing La Fontaine and featuring a pointer called Caesar who is shot by a huntsman just before he is about to kill a hare. The last couplet goes:

God helps those who help himself,
I approve of that idea myself
.

Napoleon's next surviving piece of prose is only one page long. Dated Thursday, 22 November, 1787 and written from the Hôtel de Cherbourg [...] it was entitled 'A Meeting at the Palais-Royal'. The private note, written for himself, chronicles his encounter with a prostitute he picked up in that notoriously louche area of central Paris, a neighbourhood of gambling houses, restaurants, and bijouterie shops:

I had just come out of the Italian Opera, and was walking at a good pace along the alleys of the Palais-Royal. My spirit, stirred by the feelings of vigour which are natural to it, was indifferent to the cold, but when once my mind became chilled I felt the severity of the weather, and took refuge in the galleries. I was just entering the iron gates when my eyes became fixed on a person of the other sex. The time of night, her figure, and her youth, left me no doubt what her occupation was. I looked at her; she stopped, not with the impudent air common to her class, but with a manner that was quite in harmony with the charm of her appearance. This struck me. Her timidity encouraged me, and I spoke to her. I spoke to her; I, who, more sensible than any to the horror of her condition, have always felt strained by even a look from such a person. But her pallor, her frail form, her soft voice, left me not a moment in suspense.

He walked with her into the gardens of the Palais-Royal and asked her if there wasn't 'an occupation more suited to your health', to which she replied, 'No, sir; one must live.' 'I was charmed; I saw that she at least gave me an answer, a success which I had never met with before.' He asked her where she was from (Nantes), how she lost her virginity ('An officer ruined me'), whether she was sorry for it ('Yes, very'), how she'd got to Paris, and finally, after a further barrage of questions, whether she would go back with him to her rooms, so that 'we will warm ourselves, and you can satisfy your desire'. He ends by writing: 'I had no intention of becoming over-scrupulous at this stage. I had already tempted her, so that she would not consider running away when pressed by the argument I had prepared for her, and I did not want her to start feigning an honesty that I wished to prove she did not possess.' He was not originally looking for such an encounter, but the fact that he thought it worthy of chronicling suggests that this was probably the occasion on which he lost his virginity. The controversial method of quick-fire questions was pure Napoleon.

A few days later, he began to write a history of Corsica, which he abandoned after only a few lines. Instead he took up writing a rhetorical, declamatory essay entitled 'A Parallel between Love of Glory and Love of Country', which took the form of a letter to an unnamed young lady in which he came down strongly in favour of the former. Love of glory finds its examples in French military history — he mentioned Marshals Condé and Turenne — but there is also a great deal about Sparta, Philip of Macedon, Alexander, Charlemagne, Leonidas and 'the first magistrate, the great Paoli'. 

From "Histoire de ma vie" by Giacomo Casanova:
Quote:Stupidity in a maidservant is far more dangerous than malice, and more burdensome to the master, for he may be right to punish a malicious girl, but not a stupid one: rather, he must dismiss her and learn from the experience. Mine used three notebooks, containing the details of what I am about to write in this one, to supply her household needs for paper. She said by way of excuse that since the papers were old and scribbled upon, with even some crossings-out, she thought they better served her purposes than the clean white pages that were on my desk. Had I given the value any thought, I would not have got angry; but the first effect of anger is precisely that it deprives the mind of the ability to think. It is a virtue of mine that my anger is of very short duration; irasci celerem tamen ut placabilis essem. After wasting my time covering her with insults she did not understand, and proving by clear reasoning that she was an idiot, she refuted all my arguments by answering not a word.
[Image: JBqHIg7.jpeg]
God helps those who help himself; I approve of that idea myself.



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