Medieval TND
#1
"In the 977th era [939], on the sixth on the second day of the week [Monday], at the third hour [7 or 8 in the morning], God showed a sign in heaven and the sun became darkness in around the world for about an hour [a partial eclipse of the sun]. Then, after 19 days, which is the eighth day before the Ides of August [August 6], on the day when the feast of Saints Justo and Pastor is celebrated among Christians, on the third day of On the week [Tuesday], the people of Cordoba arrived as far as Simancas with their abominable King Abderramán and all his army, and there they pitched their tents. Right there they met King Ramiro and the counts who were with him, after being summoned together with their hosts, that is: Fernán González, Asur Fernández and another multitude of fighting armies. With the help of God, they fell upon the Moors and killed with the sword on that day about three thousand or more, and there the Moor Aboyahia [Abu Yahya Muhammad ibn Hashim al-Tujibi, lord of Zaragoza] was captured. Then, after 16 days, which is the twelfth day before the Kalends of September [August 21], when the Moors had hastily fled and retreated in order to escape the land of the Christians, these came out to meet them in the place called Leokaput and in the river named Ververa, and there the Ishmaelites were dispersed, and they were shot down and stripped of their riches in great numbers [battle of Simancas in the year 939], and The Christians felt very happy, since they returned with numerous booty, and they rejoiced over the spoils they had obtained from them, and Galicia, Castilla y Álava, and also Pamplona along with their king García Sánchez [García Sánchez] were enriched with them. Sanchez I]. Thanks be to God" - Chronicle of Annales Castellani Antiquiores (10th century)

"This year Alfonso set out with an innumerable army of Christians, Franks, Vascones, Galicians and crossed al-Andalus, stopping before each of its cities, devastating, ruining, killing and captivating, to then go to another. He camped before Seville and remained there three days, devastated his region and destroyed it, destroying many villages in Aljarafe. He did the same in Sidonia and its region; then he reached the island of Tarifa, put the legs of his horse in the sea and said: «This is the end of the country of al-Andalus and I have stepped on it». Then he returned to the city of Zaragoza, besieged it and swore not to raise his siege until he took it, or until death stood between him and his purpose: it was the city he most wanted to win in all of Al-Andalus. His emir, al-Musta'in ben Hud, sent him all the money he could, but he did not receive it, saying: "The city and the money are mine." He sent troops to all the capitals of al-Andalus to narrow them down with a siege. He seized the city of Toledo in the year 477 [May 10, 1084 to April 28, 1085] [...]" - Ibn Abi Zar (14th century)

"In the name of God. I Don Alfonso [IX] King of León and Galicia, as I celebrate the Curia in León with the archbishop and bishops and with the magnates of my kingdom and with the elected citizens of each one of the cities, established and confirmed under oath, that all of my kingdom, both clerics and laity, will keep the good customs (mores), which have been established by my predecessors. [...] I also promised, that I will not make war or peace or pact, but with the council of bishops, noble and good men, by which councils I must govern. [...] I also swore that neither I, nor another, go by force to anyone's house, or do any harm to it or to his estate" - Decrees of Alfonso IX in the Curia of León (1188).
#2
Not reading all that.
Meds, med.
#3
Relatedly, a little known fact of English history:

"The animosity between the inhabitants of English and Danish race, had, from these repeated injuries, risen to a great height, when Ethelred ["the unready"], from a policy incident to weak princes embraced the cruel resolution of massacring the latter throughout all his dominions.

Secret orders were despatched to commence the execution every where on the same day, and the festival of St. Brice, which fell on a Sunday [November 13], the day on which the Danes usually bathed themselves, was chosen for that purpose. It is needless to repeat the accounts transmitted concerning the barbarity of this massacre: the rage of the populace, excited by so many injuries, sanctioned by authority, and stimulated by example, distinguished not between innocent and guilt, spared neither sex nor age, and was not satiated without the tortures as well as death of the unhappy victims" - David Hume, The History of England

Do not suppose that your Saxon ancestors, who culled first the Celts and then fellow Germans of another tribe, would not emphatically support TND or the reconquest of London.
#4
(11-15-2022, 01:16 PM)The_Author Wrote: Relatedly, a little known fact of English history:

"The animosity between the inhabitants of English and Danish race, had, from these repeated injuries, risen to a great height, when Ethelred ["the unready"], from a policy incident to weak princes embraced the cruel resolution of massacring the latter throughout all his dominions.

Secret orders were despatched to commence the execution every where on the same day, and the festival of St. Brice, which fell on a Sunday [November 13], the day on which the Danes usually bathed themselves, was chosen for that purpose. It is needless to repeat the accounts transmitted concerning the barbarity of this massacre: the rage of the populace, excited by so many injuries, sanctioned by authority, and stimulated by example, distinguished not between innocent and guilt, spared neither sex nor age, and was not satiated without the tortures as well as death of the unhappy victims" - David Hume, The History of England

Do not suppose that your Saxon ancestors, who culled first the Celts and then fellow Germans of another tribe, would not emphatically support TND or the reconquest of London.

This is in Vinland Saga. At least somewhat famous. Also relevant is the several centuries of animosity between the Anglos and the Normans after 1066. A Norman would not want to be caught alone out of sight with older stock Englishmen for a long while after that date.
#5
Let us also not forgot the tale, repeated by Ripley in The Races of Europe, in which the devout Saxon Christian Saint Guthlac, upon hearing a racket outside of his house and praying intently for salvation throughout the night, emerges the next morning to find, with great relief and rejoicing, that the noise was merely the result of devils and not of Welshmen.
#6
(11-15-2022, 10:22 PM)anthony Wrote: This is in Vinland Saga. At least somewhat famous. Also relevant is the several centuries of animosity between the Anglos and the Normans after 1066. A Norman would not want to be caught alone out of sight with older stock Englishmen for a long while after that date.

Outside the scope of a medieval thread, but interestingly enough, this theme was picked up on by Confederate propaganda in periodicals such as the Southern Literary Messenger.

The Southern people come of that race recognized as Cavaliers, directly descended from the Norman Barons of William the Conqueror."
#7
(11-16-2022, 11:35 PM)Manteuffel Wrote:
(11-15-2022, 10:22 PM)anthony Wrote: This is in Vinland Saga. At least somewhat famous. Also relevant is the several centuries of animosity between the Anglos and the Normans after 1066. A Norman would not want to be caught alone out of sight with older stock Englishmen for a long while after that date.

Outside the scope of a medieval thread, but interestingly enough, this theme was picked up on by Confederate propaganda in periodicals such as the Southern Literary Messenger.

The Southern people come of that race recognized as Cavaliers, directly descended from the Norman Barons of William the Conqueror."

Also a rather prominent point in Heisman's 'Suicide Note'.


[-]
Quick Reply
Message
Type your reply to this message here.

Human Verification
Please tick the checkbox that you see below. This process is used to prevent automated spam bots.



Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)