Recommend books in this thread
#21
There was a recent thread on twitter where someone listed out every book recommendation made by BAP on his podcast Caribbean Rhythms.

Find it here:
https://twitter.com/i/status/1585397321051013120

More readable here:
https://threadreaderapp.com/thread/15853...13120.html


Hopefully with this post people will remember this thread exists and give some more recommendations.
#22
If we're posting other peoples' lists here's a great one by Thomas777. Several books I greatly enjoy here.

https://realthomas777.substack.com/p/ess...dissidents

Also a great comment below.


Quote:I want to very much QUALIFY this post by explaining my...RELUCTANCE...as it were to drop general BOOK recs. I don't want to sound meanspirited or short, but there's a tendency among intellectually curious people to believe (subconsciously or not) that EVERYTHING that is opaque in history or the POLITICAL realm of man's existence is somehow to be found in a BOOK - it ISN'T. You WILL not find, ''THE BIG BOOK of HOLOCAUST REVISIONISM and WHY YOU SHOULD NOT ABIDE the STATE RELIGION''. NOR will you find a 200 page volume of, ''WHAT the ALLIES LIED ABOUT and WHAT REALLY HAPPENED in WORLD WAR II''. Books are a TOOL - the HISTORIAN, the ANALYST, the REVISIONIST utilizes TOOLS to construct the TRUTH of the PAST and the PRESENT - just as a carpenter uses a hammer and a saw to build a HOUSE. End of SERMON. - T
#23
(11-15-2022, 08:27 PM)anthony Wrote: If we're posting other peoples' lists here's a great one by Thomas777. Several books I greatly enjoy here.

https://realthomas777.substack.com/p/ess...dissidents

An excellent list. As a great fan of the big Chitown man and a member of the 777 Mob, I hope to work my way through all of these someday.

As for myself, here are my favorites. I will only include those which I have read myself, so there are many gaps in the broad canon, so to speak. I'm sure that most of these will not be particularly groundbreaking to you, but this is my best attempt at a "Romero canon," i.e. the books that have most informed me throughout my life. I will put a squiggle (~) before books which have some significant flaws or shortcomings IMO, but which have still strongly informed my worldview.

History and Sociology
Magicians of the Gods - Graham Hancock
The Twelve Caesars - Suetonius
Agricola - Tacitus
Germania - Tacitus
Caesar and Christ - William Durant
Ancient Rome: A New History - David Potter
The World of Late Antiquity - Peter Brown
Albion's Seed - David Hackett Fischer
~The Nine Nations of North America - Joel Garreau
~American Nations - Collin Woodard
Generations - William Strauss and Neil Howe
The Fourth Turning - William Strauss and Neil Howe
The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order - Samuel Huntington
Hitler's Table Talk - Hugh Trevor

Philosophy and Politics
The Republic - Plato
The Wit and Wisdom of Dr. Mahathir Mohamad
The Wit and Wisdom of Lee Kuan Yew
The Prince - Niccolo Machiavelli
The Art of War - Sun Tzu
Men Among the Ruins - Julius Evola
~Industrial Society and its Future - Theodore Kaczynski
~The Rational Male - Rollo Tomassi
Bronze Age Mindset - Bronze Age Pervert

Religion and Spirituality
The Bible
City of God - St. Augustine
The Confessions - St. Augustine
~The Kybalion
~The Hermetic Tradition - Julius Evola
The Metaphysics of War - Julius Evola

Biology
The 10,000 Year Explosion - Gregory Cochran and Henry Harpending
The Races of Europe - William Z. Ripley
On the Track of Unknown Animals - Bernard Heuvelmans
Living Wonders - John Michell And Robert J M Rickard

Fiction
The Hobbit - J.R.R. Tolkien
Foundation series - Isaac Asimov
Dune - Frank Herbert
Starship Troopers - Robert Heinlein
The Shadow of the Torturer - Gene Wolff
A Canticle for Leibowitz - Walter M. Miller
Based on a True Story: Not a Memoir - Norm Macdonald
Everything by H.P. Lovecraft
#24
[Image: https://i.ibb.co/w6SKhLw/basedworldreadinglist.png]
#25
(11-29-2022, 08:51 PM)BillyONare Wrote: [Image: https://i.ibb.co/w6SKhLw/basedworldreadinglist.png]

I've actually been meaning to read Made in Abyss. Good reminder and fun image.
#26
if people actually read Generative Energy, why don't they mention Peat's anti-hereditarian screeds, approvingly quoting, or outright saying, that IQ as a concept only exists to justify racism, etc.? some of this might be from his "mind and tissue" book, but GE also has such remarks.
#27
the answer is that nobody actually reads his books, and the entire list is a joke. did the hentai not tip you off?
#28
Having reread Mishimas 'Temple of The Golden Pavillon' lately I came to the conclusion that most of western reviews of it and 'Sailor Who Fell From Grace With Sea' criminally underrate his uniquely dignifying portrayal of youth rebellion in favour of concentrating on Social Issues, universal themes and such. All modernist and realist western literature I've encountered that does treat on adolescence always puts it in the context of maturing and presents it as a mere stepping stone on the way to adulthood, its quirks inconsequential or negative in results. Mishima completely rejects this convention, instead leaving his protagonists to follow their self-created ethical codes to their logical consequences and ends the story there. It seems to me that most readers can hardly comprehend it without pathologizing characters behaviour as products of mental illness or maladjustment.
#29
Reading The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt. Not far in but good so far - Roosevelt is very likeable.
#30
(12-27-2022, 04:37 PM)Tiferhil Wrote: Having reread Mishimas 'Temple of The Golden Pavillon' lately I came to the conclusion that most of western reviews of  it and 'Sailor Who Fell From Grace With Sea' criminally underrate his uniquely dignifying portrayal of youth rebellion in favour of concentrating on  Social Issues, universal themes and such. All modernist and realist western literature I've encountered that does treat on adolescence always puts it in the context of maturing and presents it as a mere stepping stone on the way to adulthood, its quirks inconsequential or negative in results. Mishima completely rejects this convention, instead leaving his protagonists to follow their self-created ethical codes to their logical consequences and ends the story there. It seems to me that most readers can hardly comprehend it without pathologizing characters behaviour as products of mental illness or maladjustment.

I think that Japanese media might be the hardest to process in the world despite its popularity. Hardest popular contemporary media anyway. They're the most sophisticated culture which hasn't been assimilated into our hive. And even before that their historical assumptions and worldviews have always been so different to our own. People have this same problem interpreting mere anime and video games. And as we get weirder increasingly less strange Japanese assumptions and possibilities become lost on most of us.
#31
(12-27-2022, 09:14 PM)anthony Wrote:
(12-27-2022, 04:37 PM)Tiferhil Wrote: Having reread Mishimas 'Temple of The Golden Pavillon' lately I came to the conclusion that most of western reviews of  it and 'Sailor Who Fell From Grace With Sea' criminally underrate his uniquely dignifying portrayal of youth rebellion in favour of concentrating on  Social Issues, universal themes and such. All modernist and realist western literature I've encountered that does treat on adolescence always puts it in the context of maturing and presents it as a mere stepping stone on the way to adulthood, its quirks inconsequential or negative in results. Mishima completely rejects this convention, instead leaving his protagonists to follow their self-created ethical codes to their logical consequences and ends the story there. It seems to me that most readers can hardly comprehend it without pathologizing characters behaviour as products of mental illness or maladjustment.

I think that Japanese media might be the hardest to process in the world despite its popularity. Hardest popular contemporary media anyway. They're the most sophisticated culture which hasn't been assimilated into our hive. And even before that their historical assumptions and worldviews have always been so different to our own. People have this same problem interpreting mere anime and video games. And as we get weirder increasingly less strange Japanese assumptions and possibilities become lost on most of us.

Very true. Since this is a thread about literature I will also recommend Junichiro Tanizakis essay "In Praise of Shadows" that treats on artistic differences between west and Japan.
#32
The Ego and It’s Own by Max Striner was a quick read. The part about the nature of Critique and talking about Liberalism was pretty good.

The Passing of The Great Race by Madison Grant was also a quick read. It’s probably outdated but something worth reading.

The Essence of Christianity by Ludwig Freuebach is a long read. I am currently reading it and it’s pretty good so far.
#33
Has anyone read Paul Town’s new book Tales from the Dissident Right?

Some passages that I had to transcribe:

Quote:After Joseph Daedalus finished coding the world’s first Star Wars Battlefront II wallhack he felt an intense surge of guilt and post nut clarity identical to how General Jaden McNeil felt after watching a BLACKED.com video and ejaculating all over the hardwood floors of the apartment his best friend Nick Fuentes inherited from his dead grandmother and was generously letting McNeil stay in.

Quote:I hate hate hate HATE The Amarna Forum. I dedicated a 72 hour fast to the downfall of The Amarna Forum.

Like much of Paul Town’s writing, it is often hard to tell if he is being ironic or not. I find this distasteful. It’s a way to seem profound without saying much and to shield himself from criticism.
#34
(01-17-2023, 06:48 PM)BillyONare Wrote: Has anyone read Paul Town’s new book Tales from the Dissident Right?

Some passages that I had to transcribe:

Quote:After Joseph Daedalus finished coding the world’s first Star Wars Battlefront II wallhack he felt an intense surge of guilt and post nut clarity identical to how General Jaden McNeil felt after watching a BLACKED.com video and ejaculating all over the hardwood floors of the apartment his best friend Nick Fuentes inherited from his dead grandmother and was generously letting McNeil stay in.

Quote:I hate hate hate HATE The Amarna Forum. I dedicated a 72 hour fast to the downfall of The Amarna Forum.

Like much of Paul Town’s writing, it is often hard to tell if he is being ironic or not. I find this distasteful. It’s a way to seem profound without saying much and to shield himself from criticism.

I keep forgetting who this Paul Town character is.
#35
Read 4 books this month so far, the first 2 listed I had already been reading in the previous year though:
Napoleon: A Life by Andrew Roberts
Red Victory: A History of the Russian Civil War by W. Bruce Lincoln
Dune by Frank Herbert
Ficciones by Jorge Luis Borges

Now I'm reading Dune Messiah and Always With Honor, after that I'll probably continue on with the Dune series while selecting "The Terrorist's Dilemma" by Jacob N. Shapiro or "The Campaigns of Napoleon" by David G. Chandler for my next non-fiction read.


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