Underexplored Reactionary Themes
#1
Counter-Revolution must begin with the arts. Both the popular and the artistically challenging writing, film, art, music, vidya, etc. of the last half-century has been dominated by left ideals while reactionary thought is left to dig for scraps, sometimes accepting anti-heroes as their own, more often reduced to nothing more than army recruitment propaganda. Without reactionary art, we will forever live in the shadow of Hollywood ghouls, the glossy vapidness of NYT bestsellers, the smoky (and admittedly, slightly pleasant) haze of the stoner hipster.

What themes, ideals, motifs, have we neglected since the end of WWII? What should an aspiring writer, composer, director, artist seek to explore in their life and work?
All right, commander!!
#2
An essential theme in a lot of great works that are able to champion a certain morality is, in fact, a focus on its darker side: Diabolism. 

Think Paradise Lost or any other story that details an arrogant and wicked hero who futilely combats insuperable higher powers. There is an essential beauty in the tragic element that has captured man since the time of the Greeks. And this cannot be done perfunctorily. You have to make the evil side look cool and heroic so that you can understand the true gravity of their actions. 

Now, although in an almost set to fail fashion I defined Diabolism in a both narrow and familiar sense this is not the true extent of diabolism. As I said earlier, diabolism has a knack for inculcating either certain spiritual teachings or moral view of the world. This is its great strength. It’s about rebellion and vitality. Yet rebellion is a profound concept. Rebellion against a cruel tyrant. Rebellion against any sort of morality while vehemently pursuing a transcendent or otherwise lofty goal. Foolish rebellion against fate and God. Rebellion is both secular and mythic. But the best part of diabolical rebellion is that it doesn’t play this gay inversion of morality where the good guys are actually evil and therefore the downtrodden marginalized side has the right to act bad because it’s good. This is what the left wants. If you want to champion your rebellious hero you don’t inverse morality, you make their object or goal nobler and worth transgressing order for.

A few final words to mitigate the unavoidable misunderstanding of what diabolism is: It’s not about gays or niggers.
#3
Honestly I think we do pretty well on the whole. Where we hurt is what you can do at scale, but even then if you're savvy you can get pretty far. In terms of real spending and human effort mustered Starship Troopers is one of the biggest films ever made (Marvel costs more but it's not actually spent on making the movie).

What should we be making that we aren't? Hard to answer just because things are really going so well provided you're willing to take pulp seriously.

[Image: Redo-Of-Healer-Season-2-Production-Updat...x568-1.jpg]

Redo of Healer got made. What are we lacking for?

Actually, anime has brought something to my mind. There's something they'll touch on pretty close, but generally kind of work around.

[Image: D4-X1-Q5-KWs-As-G43k.jpg]

Japan will do fantasy racism plots, but generally take the line of understanding between meritorious equals. This dialogue is from Fire Emblem: Path of Radiance. A funny game because it was their attempt at appealing to Americans. So the plot is about learning that racism isn't the answer and the protagonist is a moralising poorfag rather than a Lord. Of course in this game racism is actually not the answer because everyone is functionally white/Japanese. The beast-people (the source of the game's race problem, furries) are actually intelligent and decent and basically white people with tails combined with some light noble savagery.

Fire Emblem: Genealogy of the Holy War goes further with this stuff, with certain nations being perhaps dumber, cruder, more warlike (actually a few fire emblems do this to some extent), but the real bad guys are really interesting. Being that they're obviously inspired by Jews. But specifically it's their beliefs and culture which are the problem. That they are a people bound by an evil religion that means ill towards the world. This is not subtle, it is noted elsewhere.

I find that discussion funny. How these people don't really believe that anything could mean anything. It's not that it's bad. They're just so unaccustomed to the idea of anything mattering.

Now where I was going, you see. This is probably the one real theme that nobody is really dealing with even in fringes or extreme works or in meme ways. Is anybody going to make work which deals with existential dynamics between unevenly gifted human races? Is anybody allowed to explore and deal with that? Gundam (and Toward Terra and Slan) sidestep the issue by taking a pseudo-individualist or blind meritocratic approach. Anybody can be a NewType. But not everybody can be Japanese. The plight of the NewType is real, and a challenging subject. Exceptional individual elements within humanity. But what's far more challenging is exceptional elements in human races, collectively.

How much work is there on this? We have the 'Draka' novels perhaps for a start, but those are more like Heinleinian political philosophy. As much as 'Race' is a key theme, it's all kind of smoothed out by everything coming down to politics. Arguably that is an exploration of the issue, that a strong and determined race will escalate the entire human race into a condition of war and then find itself challenging equally determined rivals and either win or not. Sure. But there's so much more to do than that.

Is there an anime where the third world meaningfully exists and has to be dealt with in some way? I'll have to think about that, I really don't know. Do I want this to be a thing? Not particularly. But there's your theme we're not currently doing.
#4
Quote:What themes, ideals, motifs, have we neglected since the end of WWII? What should an aspiring writer, composer, director, artist seek to explore in their life and work?
I am not confident that there can be a list of ideas learned by rote for the betterment of art. Pretty sure others have spoken about "Warehoused films" before (here or elsewhere), which could be a good starting point for explaining why this approach can fail. Invariably, a film in this broad category is centered around frequent displays of violence and "anti-heroes", but as the term suggests, there is an element that's been ruthlessly culled well before its production. Someone attempting to imitate The Mechanic today either will use weird jewish faces and/or have to construct a script that sidesteps critical distaste for its existence; something like the The Mechanic isn't held in overt disregard, but if the creator isn't an intransigent type, they can be worn down with time through subtleties. It becomes Warehoused.

A litmus test: A young director decides to adapt The Fountainhead. Will he show the intimate union of Dominique Francon and Howard Roark, or will he omit it from the script entirely?

As with certain books released in recent memory, certain people trying to make Right Wing Art are apologetic and troubled with themselves. This is a bit of an odd example but those trying to write the Right Wing Novel are usually encumbered with the risk of making a neurotic work like Yu Dafu's Sinking [early 20th C. Chinese novella]. I'm inclined to believe self-punishment is the primary issue, since a self-published author is not subjected to the whims of anyone else, only himself. If the act of creative automatism is flawed enough to introduce self-denial, that is not the fault of automatism, only the initiator.

The main issue in the West is being conceptcucked, and most of the battle involves reversing this. There are two solutions: the first obvious one is greater attention drawn towards Japan, the second a change in Western affairs (ZOG's defeat). As you can see, one is easier in the immediate moment than the other.


I plucked the example of the Mechanic from thin air, but found something that proves what I mean. The film was remade and a sequel to it was released a few years after. The image below is extracted from the Wiki synopsis of that sequel.

[Image: mechanicremake.png]

It isn't enough that Charles Bronson killed other men in the original, we now must show Jason Statham taking out "the truly bad men".
#5
anthony Wrote:Now where I was going, you see. This is probably the one real theme that nobody is really dealing with even in fringes or extreme works or in meme ways. Is anybody going to make work which deals with existential dynamics between unevenly gifted human races? Is anybody allowed to explore and deal with that? - But what's far more challenging is exceptional elements in human races, collectively.

The closest I've seen to this is Shin Sekai Yori, an anime I've been wanting to post about here but I never got around to it. I suppose this would be a good time for a quick run down at least.
The opening of the series shows us the rapid appearance of Cantus users (extremely powerful psychics) among the human population who proceed to subjugate and eventually wipe out normal humans. The story truly begins in a far future with the Cantus users living an agrarian lifestyle with the primitive "Queerats" (sentient mole rats) living in the wilderness and largely incapable of anything beyond manual labor. Here we see one Queerat attempt a peasant revolt against the Cantus users who live in a longhouse of their own making, told alongside a coming of age story focusing on several Cantus users.

I think there's a lot for this forum to discuss but I've seen little discussion of this series elsewhere. Mainstream viewers were largely filtered by the unusual artstyle and slow start and more seasoned ones seem to leave things at adding it to their 3x3. I can't even find much on the author of the source material in English. My reading of this series does come close to what you're describing but I've never encountered anyone else who viewed it this way. Even when /ourguys/ discuss it they mostly seem to focus on sympathizing with Squealer. I can't blame them too much for this but if you're on a site like this I think you're definitely a Cantus user.
#6
I've seen Shinsekai Yori and would gladly discuss it.  (Squealer is sympathetic, but he isn't us.  Kiromaru was the most admirable Queerat.)

It's not completely untouched, but in terms of importanceConfusedalience the answer in my mind is violence and warfare (= mass violence).  Way too many on the Actual Right buy into wholesome chungus quasi-pacifism from the various angles of Longhouse Christianity, Third Positionism, Boomer Libertarianism, and just plain demoralization.  "The optimal level of violence is not zero."  The bottom line is that the ideal virtuous man is not Pacified, and neither is a virtuous people.
#7
I apologize for not sticking to the proper question of the thread, but I believe that the ability to create and push popular art is far downstream of having political and financial power. This wasn't entirely the case before, when novels and magazines were popular entertainment and the editors would be happy to public anyone who wrote well. This allowed people like Lovecraft and Robert E. Howard to be pushed to national, then international fame and influence their genres forever. Now however, such magazines mostly do not exist, the few that do are either for very niche audiences and the work published within is usually just forgotten. Web fiction is more successful but still serves a niche audience of young weirdos or other aspiring writers.

Modern day entertainment has been so thoroughly taken over that there are political filters on every level. Other than for manual labour roles on film sets, you will need to be an apex shitlib to get through these filters. The people imposing these filters are managers, editors, and other mid level roles who are assumed to simply be Doing Their Job instead of taking such poisonous action, and as such will never face consequences for letting in so many stupid, untalented people.

In my opinion, the best way to push ideas through popular art may not be actually creating art, if you are a creator you will have to become a self promoter on social media permanently, basically. The actual best way may be to push into mid level creative roles, like translators, localizers, editors, and maybe even mid level managing roles that let you filter people toward your ends.
#8
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The entry level most popular "serious" electronic musician is an anti-vaxxer. At some prior to this I also saw a news article about Laetitia Sadier issuing an apology for retweeting Jordan Peterson. Most "contemporary" artists and musicians and film makers were liberal mostly due to the odiousness of conservatism of the time. Some of these people have a history of flirting with nazi and fascist themes. It's possible to OVER-INTERPET the importance of an artists nominal politics on their work. But the main thrust to most of them is they bristle at the concept of etuiquette and self-censorship. This is by far the biggest obstacle the left presents for artists now, but of course, most of the legacy figures, like Aphex Twin, have had their fun and can drop out of the industry with contentment and so they aren't really seen fighting back against ZOG to any meaningful degree. That's not counting the MANY who are simply old and set in their ways even if they are on the side of the status quo now. 

But let's go even deeper. Afx is spergy music, spergy electronic music, and he's one these guys who seen as a mysterious, chaotic figure. Art is far too grand to be subducted beneath politics, and this is a good example. One upon a time, spergy weirdo electronic music with creepy music videos was considered "impolite" and "improper" and thus its existence in contrast with the "mainstream" of the 90s made it implicitly left wing. Even if this "mainstream" was more like the last holdouts of thatcher and reagan's legacy and not an actual status quo. 

Is that still the case nowadays? Timeless art is timeless because it endures and its status remains. People still like afx, maybe even now more than ever. But is being a very obviously male electronic music sperg, one with a clear sense of ego, one who will naturally be vaxx skeptic, one who makes fun of nigger rappers in his most famous music video IMPLICITLY LEFT WING today? In the context of the 90s it was...but is it still in the context of the 2020s? You can probably guess my answer, and this is what I'd raise at the question of unexplored themes. These themes do exist, and certainly exploring them is worthwhile, but just as likely, is that themes that were once implicitly left no longer are. I feel this is worth saying simply because so much of the shlocky RW twitter writing is bad because of the author trying to force a right wing theme to it. Sure, you can try to write about rightist ideals, but maybe it's worth considering also that there is a broad list of "timeless subjects" which were formerly unavailable to us that we can use now.
#9
To say that the majority of art since the Second World War has been left-wing or at the least tainted by left-wing beliefs/ideals is incorrect, again, not to say anyone is explicitly saying this here but that is the generally advanced position even on more "proper" right-wing Xitter. I think ASIF is correct to say that many of the artists post WW2, through the various stages of the nominally left-wing counter-culture, fell into the lap of the political left via the perceived or real opposition to artistic expression on the "right" of the time.

The art of the period from 1965-1985 (generally) and more broadly from the end of WW2 to the turn of the century is ripe for examination with keen eyes, and this has been done (if in a limited fashion) by more mainstream adjacent Xosters, most notably with the consistently re-arising Starship Troopers discourse which has now solidified (more ossified) the left-wing position to that of a claim of "media-literacy" where power is used to define the "meaning" of "pieces of media" so to prevent any counter or parallel interpretation which keeps the history of art (primarily that of post-war art) in the domain of the political left furthermore.

This "media-literacy", of course, is simplistic and uninformed even on their own level as illustrated by Anthony with Starship Troopers. The anathema to this "media-literacy" is an informed and cultured set of critics who can write (or recover) a history of culture to counter the increasingly fragmentary and half-remembered left wing narrative.
#10
Edge Wrote:
anthony Wrote:Now where I was going, you see. This is probably the one real theme that nobody is really dealing with even in fringes or extreme works or in meme ways. Is anybody going to make work which deals with existential dynamics between unevenly gifted human races? Is anybody allowed to explore and deal with that? - But what's far more challenging is exceptional elements in human races, collectively.

The closest I've seen to this is Shin Sekai Yori, an anime I've been wanting to post about here but I never got around to it. I suppose this would be a good time for a quick run down at least.
The opening of the series shows us the rapid appearance of Cantus users (extremely powerful psychics) among the human population who proceed to subjugate and eventually wipe out normal humans. The story truly begins in a far future with the Cantus users living an agrarian lifestyle with the primitive "Queerats" (sentient mole rats) living in the wilderness and largely incapable of anything beyond manual labor. Here we see one Queerat attempt a peasant revolt against the Cantus users who live in a longhouse of their own making, told alongside a coming of age story focusing on several Cantus users.

I think there's a lot for this forum to discuss but I've seen little discussion of this series elsewhere. Mainstream viewers were largely filtered by the unusual artstyle and slow start and more seasoned ones seem to leave things at adding it to their 3x3. I can't even find much on the author of the source material in English. My reading of this series does come close to what you're describing but I've never encountered anyone else who viewed it this way. Even when /ourguys/ discuss it they mostly seem to focus on sympathizing with Squealer. I can't blame them too much for this but if you're on a site like this I think you're definitely a Cantus user.
X-Men and its consequences have been a disaster for fiction.
#11
FrenziedFish Wrote:To say that the majority of art since the Second World War has been left-wing or at the least tainted by left-wing beliefs/ideals is incorrect, again, not to say anyone is explicitly saying this here but that is the generally advanced position even on more "proper" right-wing Xitter. I think ASIF is correct to say that many of the artists post WW2, through the various stages of the nominally left-wing counter-culture, fell into the lap of the political left via the perceived or real opposition to artistic expression on the "right" of the time.

The art of the period from 1965-1985 (generally) and more broadly from the end of WW2 to the turn of the century is ripe for examination with keen eyes, and this has been done (if in a limited fashion) by more mainstream adjacent Xosters, most notably with the consistently re-arising Starship Troopers discourse which has now solidified (more ossified) the left-wing position to that of a claim of "media-literacy" where power is used to define the "meaning" of "pieces of media" so to prevent any counter or parallel interpretation which keeps the history of art (primarily that of post-war art) in the domain of the political left furthermore.

This "media-literacy", of course, is simplistic and uninformed even on their own level as illustrated by Anthony with Starship Troopers. The anathema to this "media-literacy" is an informed and cultured set of critics who can write (or recover) a history of culture to counter the increasingly fragmentary and half-remembered left wing narrative.

I had an exchange with Mikka recently about Alan Moore along these lines. It's a point that's come out a few times when I see the subject. There is virtually nothing innately leftist in Alan Moore's work, but it's an assumption a lot of people hold to the point it's the cultural default read of the man. Mikka was making some comments on how it's kind of irrational to disagree with the bad government in V For Vendetta, but I replied that as presented the story doesn't paint V's resistance as rational either, or suggest that there is a good practical option not being taken by anybody.

The picture of human nature that emerges all through Moore's work is not very flattering. Moore is a misanthrope. A misanthrope who clearly sees himself as better than most people. One can offer suggestions as to where this type naturally belongs. Mikka I think called Moore a "closet fascist". A point which I don't really disagree with.

As I think I've already said in this thread, this post-war era we're talking about wasn't really even dominated by left-wing art despite the fact it was basically illegal to be a public facing right-winger. If anything the trends that prevail in all times are rightward ones. My conclusion in this Moore exchange was that if we cared to we could probably start claiming massive numbers of artists through honest appraisal of their work and character. If we cared to, that is.

Men who were the right wing type during this post-war era did not express or manifest themselves as we do today, but I believe that they are still the type. Moore had the mixed blessing of living in a type when right wing politics were impossible, but life was still bearable and offered consolations. If you thought everything was retarded and stupid and the world was oriented lowly and would pay for this, you could kind of wash your feelings in the ascendant leftist politics and sentiments of the time and get away with this elitism, pessimism, and misanthropy. Mention that corporations, among other things, are capable of behaving stupidly, and you're fine. Not just fine, celebrated. And you haven't really even sold out. These people are just stupid, and you're still saying what you really believe.

Of course they're more desperate and paranoid now. But I believe that this kind of character and behaviour was the engine of popular art during the period in question. Appraisal of this era, like everything else, I believe will vindicate us.
#12
I just watched the first episode of An Archdemon's Dilemma: How to Love Your Elf Bride. Certified kino, I would like more media exploring the theme of purchasing an elf girl slave at auction to marry.



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